The Secret War Crime

The Secret War Crime

rapeandwarledeThis is the of the toughest most heartbreaking thing I’ve read in a long time, The Secret War Crime.

Rape in war is as old as war itself. But the intimate nature of sexual assault means that the horrors often go undocumented, sanitized out of history books and glossed over in news accounts that focus on casualties and refugee numbers. Yet that mass rape is so common in wartime only makes it more corrosive. It spreads disease. Its stigma destroys families and breaks down society. It leaves unwanted children who serve as constant reminders of the worst day of their mother’s life. “Rape is a weapon even more powerful than a bomb or a bullet,” says Jeanna Mukuninwa, a 28-year-old woman from Shabunda, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. “At least with a bullet, you die. But if you have been raped, you appear to the community like someone who is cursed. After rape, no one will talk to you; no man will see you. It’s a living death.”

Why I love Scootering

Why I love Scootering

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I got my scooter a couple of weeks ago and it’s been absolutely brilliant. I’ve been whizzing all around town.

  • It’s faster than walking (I’ve cut a 35 min walk to a 20 min scoot)
  • It’s a great way to see the city
  • You are present the whole journey
  • It’s a great workout (lots of lunges)
  • It’s fun (I feel like a kid on it, a cautious kid)
Making a difference

Making a difference

I was talking to a friend about the people that made a real difference for me while I was in undergrad. They weren’t the tutors but the support staff;

The security guy Dom, who knew everyones names, a few sentences in their language and would spot when you weren’t feeling great or hadn’t been in the studio for a while.

The technicians Abi and Bim. Abi would give you a tutorial when you wanted to make something but weren’t sure (he saved so many projects). He’d help you design something so beautiful and ingenious, then you’d take it to Bim to look at how you could actually make it. He’d simplify it.

They were the people that gave people hope and put smiles on their faces everyday, and they didn’t need to get recognition to do that.

You can make a difference whatever your role :).

Momentum

Momentum

With starting a business or project it takes a while for the momentum to build. At one of the places I work the projects have started to pick up, we are getting some great wins. Thankfully! It feels like we’ve reached the top of the latest climb and it’s flattening a bit.

It’s been a a big lesson for me in letting go. We let go on both projects, were open about our position and vulnerable. Magically it gave people the space to give their input and ideas. To lend a hand.

Barbers counselling customers

Barbers counselling customers

Five Afro- Caribbean barber shops in Camden Town and Kentish Town, London are working together to help more black men open up about their mental health problems.

Such a fantastic idea! I’ve only recently started to learn about how common mental health issues are in BME communities. Podcasts like Another Round and reading research such as the Royal College of Psychiatrists has really opened my eyes to this. I used to think it was rare in our communities. It’s often not discussed or if it is you’re told to pray about it.

Taking a safe space like a barber shop to encourage people especially men to speak openly without the stigma is brilliant. Find out more here