Find your calling

Find your calling

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Finding your vocation

Finding your vocation

“Where the needs of the world and your talents cross, there lies your vocation.”

Aristotle

And yet, Krznaric argues, a significant culprit in our vocational dissatisfaction is the fact that the Industrial Revolution ushered in a cult of specialization, leading us to believe that the best way to be successful is to become an expert in a narrow field. Like Buckminster Fuller, who famously admonished against specialization, Krznaric cautions that this cult robs us of an essential part of being human: the fluidity of character and our multiple selves:

Specialization may be all well very well if you happen to have skills particularly suited to these jobs, or if you are passionate about a niche area of work, and of course there is also the benefit of feeling pride in being considered an expert. But there is equally the danger of becoming dissatisfied by the repetition inherent in many specialist professions. … Moreover, our culture of specialization conflicts with something most of us intuitively recognize, but which career advisers are only beginning to understand: we each have multiple selves. … We have complex, multi-faceted experiences, interests, values and talents, which might mean that we could also find fulfillment as a web designer, or a community police officer, or running an organic cafe.

This is a potentially liberating idea with radical implications. It raises the possibility that we might discover career fulfillment by escaping the confines of specialization and cultivating ourselves as wide achievers … allowing the various petals of our identity to fully unfold.

Krznaric advocates for finding purpose as an active aspiration rather than a passive gift:

“Without work, all life goes rotten, but when work is soulless, life stifles and dies,” wrote Albert Camus. Finding work with a soul has become one of the great aspirations of our age. … We have to realize that a vocation is not something we find, it’s something we grow— and grow into.

It is common to think of a vocation as a career that you somehow feel you were “meant to do.” I prefer a different definition, one closer to the historical origins of the concept: a vocation is a career that not only gives you fulfillment — meaning, flow, freedom — but that also has a definitive goal or a clear purpose to strive for attached to it, which drives your life and motivates you to get up in the morning.

From Brain Pickings

Question to Ask Instead of “What Do You Do?”

Question to Ask Instead of “What Do You Do?”

Absolutely love this post on medium on what to ask instead of ‘what do you do?’

I find it a hard question to answer because I do so many different things. What are you working on? is much better and more interesting.

‘What do you do?’ is so fraught with instant judgements based on the work the person does. “We are more than our jobs.”

Made me wonder; what did we ask each other when we were kids?

Check out the article here. 

Link

The difference between a job, career and calling- Elle Luna on Design Matters

I first learned about Elle Luna (such a great name) reading about the 100 days Project on The Great Discontent. https://thegreatdiscontent.com/100days. A 100 days of making.
This podcast with Debbie Millman is wide ranging but I particularly liked hearing Elle talk about finding what you love to do, work work and fun work.

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